HEAVYWEIGHT FIGHTERS ONLINE


PERFORMANCE TECHNOLOGY

Technology to Measure and Develop Striking Force
and Aerobic and Anaerobic Power of Fighters


The STRIKER and GYMCAM


The GymCam Will Be As Important to a Boxing
and MMA Trainer As a Stopwatch is to a Track Coach




The STRIKER Will Measure and Develop the Acceleration,
Leverage, and Weight (Mass) of a Fighter's Strike

Imagine a Track Coach Without a Stopwatch

The force of a strike is what knocks a fighter out. In Physics, force is MASS x ACCELERATION. Our goal is to develop Mass. Our goal is also to use methods that increase Mass in a way that increases Acceleration. Muscle weight and developing form of execution that leverages the form his body weight, adding to Mass and Acceleration. The increase in muscle and leverage of that muscle weight will increase the fighter's ability to accelerate his Mass. Remember, the super heavyweight division is open-ended.

Mass

Mass is the Fighter's weight. To maximize the weight behind his punches, the equipment must train him to develop leverage and transfer cumulatively the weight of his entire body, beginning with his legs through his hips, trunk, shoulders, through his arm and fist, maximizing the leverage of his body to maximize the efficiency of his strength to quickly transfer the weight (mass) of his whole body. The Striker does this. It measures and improves the acceleration and efficiency of the transfer of maximum mass (leverage).

Acceleration

Acceleration is the rate of increase in speed. The STRIKER measures and improves acceleration. The STRIKER not only measures and improves the acceleration of the body's mass, it improves specific conditioning. The STRIKER improves anaerobic power, a specific kind of conditioning specific to fighting.

Anaerobic Power

Anaerobic power is the ability to provide energy required to apply and maintain maximum force over a specific time period (3-5 minutes). The Striker measures and improves anaerobic power.

Acceleration Curves

The strike which has an exponential acceleration curve reaches its top speed in a dramatically steep gradient very quickly. This is the characteristic required of a short punch which will knock you out. Punch acceleration is especially critical for a short fighter who has to get inside when he's fighting a taller fighter. Tall fighters usually are trained to achieve maximum acceleration gradient at the end of their punches. You can often tell by watching the fighter shadow box. Most trainers mistakenly teach fighters to snap their punches at the end of the punch.

This bears repeating. Force is what knocks you out, and force is Mass x Acceleration. The quicker you develop your maximum speed, the better. Mass is the fighter's weight. Acceleration is the rate of increase of the speed of the fighter's punch. The ideal Acceleration would show a very steep curve when measured, indicating that he approaches his maximum punch speed quickly with the shortest punch possible.

A fighter with great speed and an exponential Acceleration curve can knock you out with a very short punch, as opposed to hitting an opponent by achieving maximum acceleration at the end of his punch with an almost fully extended arm (in the case of a straight punch). The fighter who takes the full stroke to reach maximum speed with gradual acceleration will only hit his hardest at the end of his punch.

The short or tall fighter with maximum acceleration in a short punch has a big advantage when he has his opponent up against the cage or ropes. He is a fighter with dramatically more power inside. He has maximum power inside with very short punches. This is especially true in the case of a heavyweight, since mass is half of the equation for force. If trained to maximize it, mass is an advantage. It is half of the equation for force. That's why you have weight classes


. DEVELOPING SPEED AND POWER

The UBE Ergometer

The closest training device to the STRIKER design, is called a UBE Ergometer. They have one at the Olympic Boxing Training center in Colorado Springs, at the Top Rank Boxing Gym in Las Vegas, and one in the former Ringstars gym in Las Vegas. Similar versions with limited application for fighters are at 24hr Fitness Centers.

The UBE Ergometer is made by Cybex. Visualize sitting and grabbing and holding on to the pedals of a bicycle and pedaling as fast as you can with your arms. Using the UBE, you sit on a seat and set the crank speed at which you can turn the pedals (handles) with your arms. There are four speed settings. Slow setting has a high resistance, and the fastest setting has the least resistance.

There is a dial in front of you which indicates the rpm you're achieving when turning the handles. You can watch the dial to see what your top rpm is and you can time how long it takes you to reach your maximum rpm. Few trainers use the UBE efficiently. They use it to condition a fighter's arms and shoulders.

As the UBE is currently designed, it develops incorrect form (neural pathways) and poor neuromuscular patterns. A fighter wants to develop force in throwing straight punches, pivoting and simultaneously turning his upper body, developing maximum leverage, acceleration, reach and force, and bring his hands back quickly in a straight line.

Our Patented Power and Acceleration Training Device - The STRIKER

The STRIKER is designed to correct all of the major inefficiencies of the UBE Ergometer. It will measure and improve in a major way the acceleration, speed, mass, leverage, reach, and knock-out power of a fighter's punches.

The STRIKER is different from the UBE in major ways which is very important for developing a fighter's form. Correct form will maximize the fighter's Mass leverage, maximizing the power to weight ratio, which in turn maximizes the speed, acceleration, and mass of his strikes.

1. With the UBE, the motion is rotary. Your right hand is pushing in a circle while your left hand is pulling in a circle and vice versa. The paths of both hands are circular. In using the STRIKER, you are forced to push straight out horizontally (simulating a straight punch with one hand) while you're pulling back the "punch" you just finished with the other arm.

2. With the UBE, the user sits in a seat and turns the "pedals" of the UBE with his arms and it measures arm and shoulder acceleration with no ability to pivot or turn the shoulders. Using the STRIKER, the user stands (simulating a fighter's stance), forcing him to turn his whole body (mass) behind the punch. The STRIKER is attached to the wall and is adjustable for the height of the fighter.

3. With the STRIKER, the fighter is forced to turn his hip and shoulders in sinc with the maximum forward extension of the arm throwing the punch. He neurologically "learns" to pivot, maximizing the mass of his body in accelerating one fist while simultaneously pulling back on the other side, simulating a series of correctly executed one-two punches.

4. The horizontal mechanism, set with similar speed settings, will be mounted on a vertical apparatus adjustable for the height of the user.

5. The UBE has a timer attached to the RPM meter which enables the user to perform interval training, consistent with the principle of specificity. A similar timer will be attached to the STRIKER, but the design and purpose of the timer would be different.

6. Once the fighter's maximum speed was established by the RPM meter, a timer would be designed to measure the time it takes the user to reach his maximum speed, i.e., the length and gradient of the acceleration curve. The RPM and the time would plot a power curve for the work intervals which could be shown on a readout for the trainer.

The STRIKER'S Major Advantages

1. Once the height of the device is adjusted for the user, the neuromuscular patterns (grooves) established are identical to straight punches executed by fighters.

2. To achieve maximum force, The Striker forces the user to train the large muscle groups of his legs, hips, and torso to work in sinc with the smaller muscle groups of his shoulders and arms, (turning or pivoting his body with his punches) as opposed to "arm" punches of the UBE, increasing the mass, which is half of the equation for force.

3. The position of the user is standing on his feet, pivoting and shifting his full weight behind each punch as in fighting. He is not sitting as he is in the UBE developing inefficient neuromuscular patterns.

4. The RPM and timing software and technology would be designed to provide a power curve readout with a detailed performance analysis, an extremely important part of fighting.

5. Using the STRIKER, the fighter is forced to develop more initial acceleration in the pivot, or turning, of his body to compensate for the reduced leverage or mechanical advantage of his arms at the initial part of his punch. As a fighter pivots and his arm is extended, he has more strength and leverage because of the mechanical advantage. This is similar to the added strength he has at the top of a bench press compared to when he is at the bottom part of the bench press pushing the bar up from his chest.

6. The power curve readout would record performance over time in an interval training routine. The Striker would measure and record the user's performance when he throws a series of right-left punches in five second bursts with a five second rest in between the five second bursts for three or five minute sets with a minute rest in between sets. The computer readout would indicate his performance during each set or round. The coach could evaluate his recovery rate between rounds by observing the round when he begins to fade. This would indicate the number of rounds his conditioning would enable him to compete at his max before his power begins to fade.

7. With the STRIKER, the motion is back and forth in a straight line, horizontal, and the handles are designed so that the fists can be turned over, or pronated, at the very end of the stroke.

8. With the STRIKER, you can work one arm at a time in a series of straight punches, practicing a series of jabs or a series of straight right hand punches to achieve balance in power. It's important to measure and develop symmetry in a fighter's power in both hands.

The Patent Claims Relating to the STRIKER

What is claimed and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. A method of providing quantitative assessment and relaying of athlete performance, said method comprising the steps of: assessing athlete performance characteristics using an ergometer-type athlete performance evaluation device to obtain athlete performance information, comprising: measuring the acceleration of a punching motion; measuring the maximum velocity of a punching motion; and measuring the time it takes to reach the maximum velocity of a punching motion; quantifying said athlete performance information; and relaying said athlete performance information to an intended beneficiary using relaying technology.

"The method of claim 1 wherein the step of assessing athlete performance characteristics uses an ergometer type athlete performance evaluation device comprising: an adjustable base support; an upper assembly module associated with said adjustable base support, said upper assembly module comprising a resistance varying assembly, a control center, and relaying technology; extension arms extending in opposing directions from said upper assembly module and outward toward a user, said extension arms moving in a resisted bi-directional manner to simulate straight-line punching of an athlete."


The GYMCAM

Optical Sensing Technology


Measuring acceleration, a critical component of force, does not require resistance. It can be easily measured by a coach who films shadow boxing or sparring with a specially programmed optical sensing camera. The fighters filmed wear reflective wristbands.

Imagine a Track Coach Without a Stopwatch

Measuring the acceleration of a fighter's punch is as important to trainers of fighters as a stop watch is to a track coach.

Knowing how hard an fighter can strike is critical. If a fighter can't hit, he should not fight for a living. If a trainer has no way of measuring and improving a fighter's acceleration and power, his training is sorely lacking.

The best way to measure a fighter's speed and the length and shape of his acceleration curve is with an optical sensing system (our patent). This method will measure specific speed, acceleration, and punch rates for each fighter for each round.

A trainer can track and record periodically the development and improvement of speed and acceleration as well as punch rate and averages for each round over several rounds. This will determine the number and length of rounds the fighter is ready to fight without fading in his punch rate, speed, and acceleration.

The Patent Claims Relating to the GymCam

"A method of providing quantitative assessment and relaying of athlete performance, said method comprising the steps of: assessing athlete performance characteristics using an optical sensing athlete performance evaluation device to obtain athlete performance information, comprising: measuring the acceleration of a punching motion; measuring the maximum velocity of a punching motion; and measuring the time it takes to reach the maximum velocity of a punching motion; quantifying said athlete performance information; and relaying said athlete performance information to an intended beneficiary using relaying technology."

Our SLIP and HIT Training Device

This is an arrangement simulating an opponent's head and body which is adjustable to simulate opponent's height and jab and attaches to a wall. It forces you to slip opponent's straight punch leads and uses accelerometers to measure and record force of both left and right hooks and uppercuts to head and left and right hooks and straight right hands to the body.

"A method of claim 12 providing quantitative assessment and relaying of athlete performance, said method comprising the steps of: assessing athlete performance characteristics using an accelerometer athlete performance evaluation device to obtain athlete performance information, comprising: measuring the acceleration of a punching motion; measuring the maximum velocity of a punching motion; and measuring the time it takes to reach the maximum velocity of a punching motion; quantifying said athlete performance information; and relaying said athlete performance information to an intended beneficiary using relaying technology.



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